Media Center


ADOT News Release

For additional information:

ADOT Media Relations



Have fun in the snow, but don’t park along highways to play

Common safety mistake endangers those who park, other drivers
February 23, 2018

PHOENIX – Heading to Arizona’s high country this weekend to ski, sled and have snowball fights? Make sure you leave prepared to spend extended time in winter conditions, and please don’t park along highways.

2017 US 180 Cars Parked on ShoulderHighway shoulders are for emergencies only. Along with the threat of another driver hitting your vehicle on a shoulder and the possibility that an emergency vehicle or snowplow will need to use the shoulder, consider the following if tempted to park along a highway to play in the snow.

  • ADOT plows can throw snow and ice up to 30 feet off roadways.
  • Other drivers may pull over as well to play in the snow, compounding the problem.
  • It’s much safer to re-enter highways from on-ramps and other designated entrances.

ADOT has placed signs between mileposts 220-229 of US 180 northwest of Flagstaff warning drivers not to park on shoulders unless it’s an emergency.

Heavy traffic around popular snow-play areas can lead to delays. For those seeking snow along US 180, it can take 90 minutes or longer to get back to Flagstaff at day’s end. Once in Flagstaff, those heading south on Interstate 17 can save time by following signs to the Interstate 40/Butler Avenue interchange, then driving west to I-17.

Information on snow-play areas around Flagstaff is available at or 1.844.256.SNOW.

Wherever you may be traveling this weekend in Arizona’s high country, prepare for the possibility of delays caused by crashes or heavy traffic. Pack an emergency kit with items like extra blankets, warm clothes, food and water, healthy snacks, cat litter or sand for traction, and a first-aid kit. Make sure your gas tank is at least three-quarters full and take along a fully charged cellphone.

Prepare your vehicle as well by ensuring that your wipers, window defroster, headlights, taillights, brake lights and turn signals work.

Visit for more tips on driving in winter weather.

To stay up-to-date with the latest highway conditions around the state, visit the ADOT Traveler Information Center at or call 511. ADOT’s Twitter (@ArizonaDOT) and Facebook page (/AZDOT) are excellent sources of information and interaction. When a freeway closure or other major traffic event occurs, our free app available at will send critical information directly to app users in affected areas – where possible, in advance of alternate routes.

The Arizona Ombudsman – Citizens Aide helps you resolve ongoing issues with State Agencies.

Civil RightsTitle VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), ADOT does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability. Persons that require a reasonable accommodation based on language or disability should contact ADOT’s Civil Rights Office at Requests should be made as early as possible to ensure the State has an opportunity to address the accommodation.

De acuerdo con el título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 y la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés), el Departamento de Transporte de Arizona (ADOT por sus siglas en inglés) no discrimina por raza, color, nacionalidad, edad, género o discapacidad.  Personas que requieren asistencia (dentro de lo razonable) ya sea por el idioma o por discapacidad deben ponerse en contacto con la Oficina de Derechos Civiles en Las solicitudes deben hacerse lo más pronto posible para asegurar que el equipo encargado del proyecto tenga la oportunidad de hacer los arreglos necesarios.